Sunday, 11 November 2012

TOP TEN SUPERHUMANS


10. Rathakrishnan Velu

On August 30, 2007, the eve of Malaysia’s 50th Independence Day, Rathakrishnan Velu (or Raja Gigi, as he is known locally) broke his own world record for pulling train with his teeth, this time with 6 coaches attached weighing 297.1 tons over a distance of 2.8 metres at the Old Kuala Lumpur Railway Station. Raja Gigi, from Tampin in Malaysia learned a technique of concentrating his powers to any part of his body from an Indian guru at a young age of 14.

9. Thai Ngoc

Thai Ngoc or Hai Ngoc is a Vietnamese insomniac. According to Vietnamese news organization Thanh Nien, he is best known for his claim of being awake for 38 years. Thanh Nien also claimed that Ngoc acquired the ability to go without sleep after a bout of fever in 1973, but according to the Vietnam Investment Review, there was no apparent cause. At the time of the Thanh Nien report, Ngoc suffered from no apparent ill effect other than being unable to sleep. He was mentally sound and carries two 50 kg bags of pig feed down the 4 km road every day.
In October 2006, however, Ngoc reported that he was beginning to feel “like a plant without water” due to the lack of sleep.
8. MONKFORCE!

Experts have been studying Buddhist monks for more than 20 years, trying to figure out just how in the hell they’re doing what they do. By using a meditation technique called Tum-mo, these monks can lower their metabolism by 64 percent. To put it in perspective, your metabolism only drops 10 to 15 percent when you sleep. And yes, you should feel bad that there are people who make you look uptight when you’re asleep.
But far more awesome than that, the monks can also increase the temperatures of their fingers and toes by 17 degrees. No one knows how.
7. Liew Thow Lin

Liew Thow Lin of Malaysia is known as the “Magnet Man” because he has the ability to stick metal objects to his body.
Liew has performed in many charity events showing his ability.[citation needed] He can make metal objects, weighing up to 2 kg each, up to 36 kg total, stick to his skin. He has also pulled a car using this ability.
Liew’s ability is not due to any source of magnetism. Scientists from Malaysia’s University of Technology found no magnetic field in Lin’s body, but did determine that his skin exhibits very high levels of friction, providing a “suction effect”. The trait appears to be genetic, appearing in Lin’s three grandchildren.
Liew was featured on the second episode of the Discovery Channel’s One Step Beyond.
6. Michel Lotito

Michel Lotito was a French entertainer, born in Grenoble, famous for deliberately consuming indigestible objects. He came to be known as Monsieur Mangetout (“Mister Eat All The Things”).
His performances involved the consumption of metal, glass, rubber and other materials. He disassembled, cut-up, and consumed bicycles, shopping carts, televisions, a Cessna 150, and other items. The Cessna 150 took roughly two years to be “eaten,” from 1978 to 1980. He began eating unusual material as a child around 9 years of age and performed publicly from 1966.
Lotito claimed not to suffer ill effects from consuming the materials, even after consuming materials usually considered poisonous. When performing he consumed around a 1 kilogram (2.2 lb) of material daily, preceding it with mineral oil and drinking considerable quantities of water during the meal.He said, however, that bananas and hard-boiled eggs made him sick. It is estimated that between 1959–1997 Lotito had eaten around 9 ton of metal.

5. Daniel Browning Smith

Five time Guiness Record holder, The Rubberboy is the most flexible man alive and the most famous contortionist. He has been in many professional basketball or baseball games and on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, ESPN’s Sports Center, Oprah Winfrey, Ripley’s Believe It or Not, Cirque du Soleil, Best Damn Sports Show Period, The Discovery Channel, Men in Black 2, HBO’s Carnivale, and CSI: NY and American got a talent. He dislocates his arms to crawl through an unstrung tennis racquet. He performs contortion handstands and unique acrobatics.

4. Tim Cridland

Zamora the Torture King is the stage name of Tim Cridland, an American sideshow performer. Zamora was an original member of the Jim Rose Circus where he performed painful feats as entertainment. His stunts include fire eating, sword swallowing, body skewering and electrocution. Zamora co-authored (with Jan Gregor) Circus of the Scars, a history of the Jim Rose Circus.
Zamora was also a founding member of The Lollapalooza Sideshow and has been featured on Ripley’s Believe It or Not!, 48 Hours, and Stan Lee’s Superhumans.

3. Masutatsu Oyama The Godhand

Masutatsu Oyama was born in Korea in 1927 and later moved to Japan, where he studied karate. Unlike most famous martial artists, Oyama is not famous for his movie roles, where stunt men and clever editing can make anyone look like a badass.
No, Oyama preferred a different sort of theater. He used to have live public demonstrations where he would fight and kill a bull with his bare hands. Just because it bears repeating, let’s write that again: He could kill a bull with his hands. If you want to know how idiotically hard that is, we cordially invite you to go out and punch a bull in the face. Go on, we’ll wait here. OK, we’re not really waiting since whoever just went out to try that isn’t coming back.
2. Ben Underwood

Human echolocation is the ability of humans to detect objects in their environment by sensing echoes from those objects. By actively creating sounds – for example, by tapping their canes, lightly stomping their foot or making clicking noises with their mouths – people trained to orientate with echolocation can interpret the sound waves reflected by nearby objects, accurately identifying their location and size. This ability is used by some blind people for acoustic wayfinding, or navigating within their environment using auditory rather than visual cues. It is similar in principle to active sonar and to the animal echolocation employed by some animals, including bats and dolphins.

1. Daniel Tammet

Tammet holds the European record for memorising and recounting pi to 22,514 digits in just over five hours. He also speaks a variety of languages including English, French, Finnish, German, Spanish, Lithuanian, Romanian, Estonian, Icelandic, Welsh and Esperanto. He particularly likes Estonian, because it is rich in vowels. Tammet is creating a new language called Mänti. Tammet is capable of learning new languages very quickly. To prove this for the Channel Five documentary, Tammet was challenged to learn Icelandic in one week. Seven days later he appeared on Icelandic television conversing in Icelandic, with his Icelandic language instructor saying it was “not human.”